Isham-Terry House

211 High Street, Hartford, CT 06103
(860) 247-8996

Notice: Isham-Terry House is open for tours by-appointment only from November through the end of February. Please use “tour inquiry” button to the right to send an email to our site administrator who will help schedule your tour.

Isham-Terry House

211 High Street, Hartford, CT 06103
(860) 247-8996 x 11

$12/Adult
$10/Senior, Student, or Teacher
$5/Child 6-18
Free for Connecticut Landmarks Members & Children under 6

The lone survivor of a once vibrant Hartford neighborhood, the Isham-Terry House is a time capsule of genteel life in turn-of-the-century Hartford. In 1896, Dr. Oliver Isham purchased the 1854 Italianate house for his medical practice and as a home for himself, his parents and his three sisters. His sisters, Julia and Charlotte, lived in the house until their deaths in the 1970s as urban renewal claimed many of the houses in the once-grand neighborhood. Explore this beloved family home to learn about the booming industries and culture of Hartford in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, understand medical practice and public health at this time, and learn more about the Isham and Terry families through the items they owned.

LEARN MORE

Built in 1854 by Ebenezer Roberts, the house was purchased by Dr. Oliver Isham in 1896. A descendant of the locally prominent Isham and Terry families, he operated his doctor’s office out of the house while living there with his parents and three sisters. In the mid-20th century, as most of the houses in the neighborhood were torn down to make way for the highway, Julia and Charlotte Isham remained in the house and resisted the encroachment of I-84. Today, the house is prominently visible from I-84 East, which passes within a few dozen feet of the structure.

The footprint of the house remains the same as it was when it was built in 1854, with the three-story rectangular tower added in 1883. The 15-room mansion is adorned with crown moldings, ceiling medallions, Lincrusta wall coverings, hand-painted walls and ceilings, gilt mirrors and valances, stained glass windows, elaborate gas-light chandeliers and many original kitchen and bathroom appliances and fixtures.

It is filled with objects of historical, artistic and family significance including antique furnishings, decorative arts, rare books, the Terry clocks made famous by the last residents’ great great uncle Eli Terry, early Connecticut auto ephemera, and memorabilia from Hartford Public High School, the Ishams’ beloved alma mater. Dr. Isham’s medical office, with surgical instruments and medicines, has been left largely undisturbed since the 1940s.

LEARN MORE

Built in 1854 by Ebenezer Roberts, the house was purchased by Dr. Oliver Isham in 1896. A descendant of the locally prominent Isham and Terry families, he operated his doctor’s office out of the house while living there with his parents and three sisters. In the mid-20th century, as most of the houses in the neighborhood were torn down to make way for the highway, Julia and Charlotte Isham remained in the house and resisted the encroachment of I-84. Today, the house is prominently visible from I-84 East, which passes within a few dozen feet of the structure.

The footprint of the house remains the same as it was when it was built in 1854, with the three-story rectangular tower added in 1883. The 15-room mansion is adorned with crown moldings, ceiling medallions, Lincrusta wall coverings, hand-painted walls and ceilings, gilt mirrors and valances, stained glass windows, elaborate gas-light chandeliers and many original kitchen and bathroom appliances and fixtures.

It is filled with objects of historical, artistic and family significance including antique furnishings, decorative arts, rare books, the Terry clocks made famous by the last residents’ great great uncle Eli Terry, early Connecticut auto ephemera, and memorabilia from Hartford Public High School, the Ishams’ beloved alma mater. Dr. Isham’s medical office, with surgical instruments and medicines, has been left largely undisturbed since the 1940s.